Sign In

    Can Alzheimer's Disease be Prevented?

    Last updated 12 days ago

    Alzheimer’s disease is a devastating cause of dementia in which the brain’s nerve cells become blocked by dense deposits of plaque in the brain tissue. Once Alzheimer’s begins to develop, there is no way to reverse the damage; the disease can only be slowed down. While research does continue to search for a cure for Alzheimer’s, prevention is currently considered the best hope for reducing the devastation of this disease. Alzheimer’s is not only hard on the patients who have it, but it can also be a significant challenge for family members, as patients who are struggling with severe dementia in later stages of the disease may no longer be able to recognize them. This article will serve as a guide to prevention to help everyone reduce the impact of Alzheimer’s disease.

    Inherited Alzheimer’s

    In a very small percentage of people—less than 1% of the population—there are genetic mutations that are associated with early-onset Alzheimer’s disease. In these individuals, Alzheimer’s will be an inevitability, but research is pointing to drugs and treatments that might delay or reduce the severity of symptoms.

    Prevention possibilities

    For the majority of people, Alzheimer’s prevention is a possibility, though there does not appear to be a single answer for prevention that works. Currently, a cocktail of certain habits seems to be the best way to prevent Alzheimer’s since there are so many factors that can affect brain health. Habits that promote your overall health such as following a reasonable diet and exercising regularly help with Alzheimer’s prevention as well, so there is all the more reason to begin making changes in these areas if you struggle to eat right or stay active. Other keys to prevention may include ongoing social engagement and brain exercise with puzzles and games that challenge the mind. Keeping the mind active seems to have a positive result in delaying or preventing memory loss, so older adults should be careful not to settle into routines that do not stimulate the mind.

    If you suspect that a loved one is showing the early signs of dementia, connect with the Neurology & Neurosurgery Department at MountainView Hospital. You can reach us on our website or by calling our Consult-A-Nurse healthcare referral line at (702) 233-5474. 

    Understanding the Biggest Health Concerns for Men

    Last updated 14 days ago

    Men and women have many of the same health concerns when it comes to the leading causes of death among each gender, but men tend to die more frequently and at younger ages from these common conditions. One reason for this is that men are much less likely than women to see a doctor for regular screenings and newly developed symptoms that could point to potentially serious conditions. By recognizing some of the more significant health concerns that men face, men can know when seeing a doctor is important and should not be put on hold.

    Heart Disease

    By a significant margin, heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. However, it may be preventable with some knowledge about the factors that lead to heart disease—including high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and diabetes. Unfortunately, these indicators can work in silence, so annual screenings are essential to check the numbers. When a condition like high cholesterol is spotted and addressed early, the chances of heart disease go down.

    Colon Cancer

    Men over the age of 50 should have a colonoscopy to screen for colon cancer, which is the second-leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Identifying cancer at the local stage with screening significantly improves the survival rate to 90%.

    Hepatitis C

    Men born between 1945 and 1965 should be screened once for hepatitis C, which is a contagious viral infection of the liver that is common among this age group. Anyone who has ever used needles to inject drugs should also be screened

    Depression

    Depression is more common in women, but it should not be overlooked in men. Typically men suffering from depression will not seek psychological care as the problem worsens. Men who are affected by depression may experience a number of related health problems that stem from poor sleep patterns, self-destructive behavior, and dietary changes that are all common with depression.

    Men in Las Vegas can find complete medical care and healthy living classes at MountainView Hospital, which provides a full spectrum of hospital services and community programs for better health. Call our Consult-A-Nurse healthcare referral line at (702) 233-5474 to explore the ways we can help you boost your health. 

    Why Expecting Moms Should Be Concerned During Flu Season

    Last updated 26 days ago

    During flu season, pregnant women should take extra precautions to protect themselves and their babies. Because the immune system is weakened during pregnancy, pregnant women are more susceptible to the flu and more likely to have complications that require emergency care. This video explains more.

    Watch this video to learn about the importance of flu shots for pregnant women. To lessen the chance of flu exposure, expectant moms should encourage everyone in their households to get flu shots. Pregnant women should also be cautious about interacting with people with obvious respiratory infections and seek emergency care if they do develop the flu and experience complications.

    MountainView Hospital in Las Vegas has all of the services moms-to-be need, from emergency care to a maternity center. Get more information about our hospital by calling (702) 233-5474. 

    A Look at MountainView Hospital's Spine Program

    Last updated 28 days ago

    Back pain impacts most people at some point in their lives and the effects can be debilitating. When non-invasive treatments aren’t enough, it’s time to contact the Spine Program at MountainView Hospital in Las Vegas. Our compassionate team of experts offers cutting-edge care designed to get you back to your normal activities as quickly as possible.

    Our spine surgeons take a conservative approach to patient care, always choosing the least extensive procedure possible to address your condition. This approach ensures you have the fastest and most comfortable recovery you can have. In addition to our expert surgeons and nurses, we also have a spine coordinator who can help you and your family through every stage of surgery and recovery. With our program coordinator, you will always have a direct liaison between you and your surgeon.

    A commitment to excellent patient care is found in all of our departments at MountainView Hospital. Let one of the nurses on our Consult-A-Nurse line answer your questions about our hospital, including any queries about spine surgery, robotic surgery, and much more. Call us in Las Vegas today at (702) 233-5474. 

    What All Women Should Know about Breast Cancer

    Last updated 1 month ago

    After skin cancer, breast cancer is the most common kind of cancer among women in the United States. In addition, breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in women, after lung cancer. However, more and more women are now surviving the disease. At MountainView Hospital in Las Vegas, we help women face breast cancer with screening tests at our Red Rock Radiology unit and compassionate care in our Cancer Center. Educating yourself about breast cancer can help you take control of your health. Here are some facts every woman needs to know.

    Risk Factors

    Your risk factors for breast cancer can be divided into two categories: risks you can change and risks you can’t. Some risk factors for breast cancer that are in your control include obesity, lack of physical activity, and the use hormone-based medications, including birth control and hormone therapy. Risk factors you can’t change include family history of breast cancer, age, and race. Breast cancer is most common in women over age 55 and in Caucasian women. However, African-American women are more likely to die of breast cancer.

    Diagnosis

    Breast cancer is usually diagnosed after a lump is discovered during a self-exam or during a mammogram at a hospital. It’s important to follow your doctor’s suggestions for cancer screenings, as early diagnosis of breast cancer usually means treatment is less invasive and more effective.

    Treatment Options

    There are many different ways breast cancer can be treated, and accordingly, many women survive this disease. Potential treatments include surgery, radiation, chemotherapy, and hormone treatments. Your doctor will work closely with you to develop a treatment plan that is right for the size, type, and location of your cancer.

    The Cancer Care department at MountainView Hospital is a dedicated, 24-bed unit with case managers on hand to see you through your entire cancer treatment process. For a referral to a physician or for more information, please call us at (702) 233-5474. Don’t forget to ask about our other services, including stroke care, emergency care, and our heart hospital services. 

Use iTriage®'s New iNotify Feature

Tell our ER staff in advance that you are on your way to MountainView Hospital




Mashable Award Badge


Links

Disclaimer: The materials provided are intended for informational purposes only. You should contact your doctor for medical advice. Use of and access to this website or other materials do not create a physician-patient relationship. The opinions expressed through this website are the opinions of the individual author and may not reflect the opinions of the hospital, medical staff, or any individual physician or other healthcare professional.
  • Recent Posts
    • Loading posts... Spinner
  • View All
  • Recent Comments
    • Loading comments... Spinner
  • Popular Tags
    • Loading tags... Spinner